Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Quality of LIfe’ Category

 

Some things we simply never get over, no matter how much we try, no matter how many activities we join, no matter how many aerobics classes we attend, no matter how much we put one foot in front of the other.

Bill is in his mid-sixties. Nine years ago he was a chief executive of a prestigious company. The management team changed and he was asked to resign. He was devastated. He had been with the company for over thirty years, sometimes working sixty to seventy hours a week. When told he was being let go, to his credit, Bill immediately hustled another job.

Today he works for a little less than half the pay, but since his children are through college and his house is paid for, he and his wife manage. It’s just that he has never been able to entirely shake off the bad feelings from being let go. He doesn’t dwell on it. He doesn’t go around and bad mouth the company. He still sees some friends who are with the company. But always he fights twinges of depression.

Five years ago Sally was forced to give up her big old house and move to another state when her husband was transferred. Today she lives in a beautiful new house. Everyone who visits tells her how lovely it is. She has worked hard to make it nice. Yet periodically she still yearns for her old home.

Susan and Jim were married for twenty-six years. They had five children. Jim moved up the corporate ladder. Susan took care of the children. When it was announced that Jim was to become president of the company and relocate to the company’s headquarters, Jim told Susan that he was not taking her or the family with him. Instead he took his secretary, whom he subsequently has married.

It’s now ten years later. The children are raised. Susan has completed her MBA and has a job she enjoys. She has dated many men and has had two semi-serious relationships. She has good friends and an active social life. Susan has done everything the books tell her to do in order to move on and not look back. Still, she fights a low-level depression and her self-esteem has never quite recovered since Jim left her.

Sometimes people don’t completely get over a loss.

Check out Doris’ latest books, “The Boy Whose Idea Could Feed the World” as well as, “The Parent Teacher Discussion Guide” and “Thin Becomes You”.

Doris’ web page: www.doriswildhelmering.com

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Up to increasing your ethical capital? How about playing a game? Everyone who plays wins! Can’t beat those odds.

You can play the game by yourself, with family, with colleagues at work or with
your students in the classroom. Expect some laughter as well as some comments
such as, “Do you think so?” Or, “No way! I can’t see it.”

The only rule: No getting irritated or stomping away as a few sensitive people have been known to do.

The game you’ll be playing is called: “HORSE or PIG or FISH?”

If playing alone, think about your face, focusing primarily on the shape of your nose. Does your nose resemble a pig, a fish or a horse? If you can’t decide check it out the next time you’re in front of a mirror. Think about your family. Take a look at the other folks at your job. I myself am a horse and my husband is a fish. We have three kids: A fish, a horse and a pig. (By the way, this has nothing to do with how she has kept her room.)

What I’ve seen when playing “HORSE or PIG or FISH?” is that a good many people get caught up in not wanting to be labeled a pig. Some are not so keen on being labeled a horse or a fish. We all have our biases.

Think: Did you put a negative spin on one of the three labels? Many do. If so, you took a bit of diversity and dubbed it undesirable. That’s how prejudice starts.

We look at something and instead of thinking neutral thoughts we lean toward making a negative judgment if it’s not aligned with our view of the world. This is how the human brain is wired. We’re genetically conditioned to think negative first when something doesn’t support or confirm how we think things should be.

The following experiment is an eye-opener guaranteed to help both adults and children move from one view of being critical to a second view of neutrality. Or even having a complete turn-around involving admiration.

If you put a baby on the floor and you lie next to the baby, trying to do everything the baby does, moving your arms and legs and head as much as the baby for a period of fifteen minutes, guess what? You can’t keep up with the baby. No matter how many times you work out each week or how many miles you can bike or how much weight you can lift. You run out of energy and become exhausted way before the baby does. In that way, the baby is superior to you.

Think of a street person. Isn’t she superior to you in how she braves the elements and demands little in life? How about the kid who whizzes by you on a skateboard? (I tried my kid’s skateboard years ago and about broke my neck.) How would you fair?

What about the guy who works in the hot sun putting on roofs? Or the gal who has fancy flowers and trees tattooed all over her right arm? You might not want a sleeve yourself, and you can’t figure out why someone else would want one, but would you have the courage to endure the pain that it takes to be tattooed with such elaborate artwork?

Each time you see someone that is unlike you or chooses to live life differently from you, remind yourself of the following: “Each person is in some way my superior, and in that I can learn from him.” So look around and see how each person – man, woman, and child – is superior. The more you’re able to operate from this mind-set, the greater your ethical capital.

Check out Doris’ latest books, “The Boy Whose Idea Could Feed the World” as well as, “The Parent Teacher Discussion Guide” and “Thin Becomes You”.

Doris’ web page: www.doriswildhelmering.com.com

Read Full Post »

Catherine who had a mastec­tomy several years ago and has been gaining weight ever since, has slowly been losing confidence in herself. Through most of her life, Catherine has liked herself. But since her cancer, her self-esteem has been shot. “I’m also poor now,” she says, “so I can’t go out and buy myself something so I can feel good about me.”

Mike, on the other hand, has never felt good about himself. As a child he was underweight and the littlest in the class. Although he’s average size now, he still doesn’t feel good about his looks. He also feels badly about his lack of a college education. “My parents didn’t go to college and they didn’t push us kids. No one in my family ever asked, what do you want to be when you grow up? What are your goals?”

Jim doesn’t respect himself because he repeatedly manipulates his expense account and takes advantage of his partner. He says, “I always have this gnawing feeling that I’m not a good person.”

Mary lost her self-esteem when her husband left her.

Sue lost hers when she had to get a job outside the home and found she had few saleable skills. She works as a teacher’s aide and hates every minute of it. “It’s humiliating having someone fresh out of college telling me what to do.”

All these people are seeking counseling because of their poor self-esteem.

What is this elusive concept of self-esteem? Most psychotherapists would agree that it’s a feeling a person has that he is valuable. He likes himself. He feels adequate.

Some people seem to have had high self-esteem most of their lives. As far back as they can remember they liked themselves. When others look back, all they can recall are only bad feelings about themselves.

For most of us, self-esteem goes up and down, depending on what’s happening in our life. Poor health, job loss, marital problems, inability to lose weight, and not being able to pay bills generally lowers self-esteem. A promotion, a happy marriage, a signed contract, a new hair-do, or a clean house may increase one’s self-esteem.

Most people can improve their self-esteem. The way to feeling better is to ask yourself, “What would make me feel more valuable?”

If you find that the answer is a college education, sign up now. Start with one class. If you believe the answer to your poor self-concept is to have a boyfriend, put yourself in more situations where you can meet someone. If your self-esteem has plummeted because of a job loss, set a goal of contacting fifteen possible employers per week. A person who is actively pursuing a goal automatically feels more self-esteem.

If you can’t get back something you’ve lost, such as health or a husband, come up with some substitutions in your life that will give you a feeling of self-worth. Become an expert on Matisse or Beethoven or mission furniture. Walk three miles a day. Visit your church once a week. When people set and pursue goals their self-esteem grows.

Check out Doris’ latest books, “The Boy Whose Idea Could Feed the World” as well as, “The Parent Teacher Discussion Guide.” and “Thin Becomes You”.  Doris’ web page: www.doriswildhelmering.com

Read Full Post »

All my life I have been a dog person. My first recollection of having a dog was when I was a small child. The dog’s name was Bum. He came by that name honestly because he was always on the run. He would jump the fence and away he would go. The only other thing I remember about that dog was that my mom loved him dearly. So I did too. Following Bum, my family had a succession of dogs…Candy, Lady, Boots.

When I was 5 or 6 years old, a stray cat appeared at the door. It was winter, so my parents broke down and took him in. He managed to outstay his welcome in less that 48 hours. I still remember my mom saying, “I hate cats. They are everywhere. They get in your pots and pans. They get on the kitchen table. Out with the cat.” My mom hated cats. So I did too.

When I grew up and had my own family, we got a dog, Fluffy. Then we got Barker. Across town my parents also had two dogs and my sister had two dogs. You might say we were confirmed dog lovers.

Then something happened. Our daughter requested a cat. She was a mere three years old. “Now how could a little girl who is surrounded by dogs and dog lovers want a cat?” I thought. Every birthday and holiday thereafter she pressed for a cat. Every birthday and holiday I resisted until one day my love for my daughter overcame me and I said, “Oh alright. We’ll get a cat.”

That was some years ago. We then got two cats, Cornbread and Emily. When I walked in the door, Cornbread was there waiting. Then along would come Emily for some attention. I loved to watch them play. Cornbread swished his tail back and forth, back and forth, while Emily tried to catch it. They would also chase each other around the house at breakneck speed. As I watched them, I frequently would feel a smile on my face. You might say, I fell in love with cats.

Which leads me to a question I’m often asked. Can people really change?
The answer – YES.

Check out Doris’ latest books, “The Boy Whose Idea Could Feed the World” as well as, “The Parent Teacher Discussion Guide.” and “Thin Becomes You”.

Doris’ web page: www.doriswildhelmering.com

Read Full Post »

The following story is Zen. Of all stories, this one has helped me keep troubles and disappointments in my life in perspective. I hope the story will serve you as well.

A very wealthy man visited a prophet and commissioned him to write something special about riches and prosperity for his family. What the man was looking for was words of wisdom or insight that he could pass down from generation to generation.

After taking the man’s money the prophet pulled out a large piece of paper and wrote:

Father dies

Son dies

Grandson dies

He then handed the paper to the man.

“What is this?” asked the rich man. “Is this some sort of a joke? I asked you to write me something regarding prosperity and riches for my family to treasure and you write me this?”

The prophet then explained.

“If your son dies before you, you will be sad for the rest of your days.

“If your grandson should die before you, you and your son will be heartbroken.

“If your family dies, generation after generation, in the order I have written, your family is truly prosperous.”

Check out Doris’ latest books, “The Boy Whose Idea Could Feed the World” as well as, “The Parent Teacher Discussion Guide.” and “Thin Becomes You”. Doris’ web page: www.doriswildhelmering.com

Read Full Post »

These six steps may sound too easy to be true, but each tenant is rooted in science and neuro-linguistic programming. Read the list. Copy it. Post it. E-mail it to a friend.

1) Flood your brain hundreds of times each day with the positive affirmation, “I choose to eat carefully and exercise with vigor.”

2) Buy a fitness tracker and learn how many steps you actually take. Ideally you will be taking between 8,000 and 10,000 steps each day.

3) Give yourself a special goal each and every day. This is called your today goal.
For example:
“Today I’ll pass up all snacks and desserts.”
“Today I’ll work out with my hand weights for 5 minutes.”

4) Pick a weight loss plan that has worked for you in the past: for example, counting calories or Weight Watcher points.

5) E-mail or text a friend each day and tell them how you’re doing. Let them know if you’re saying your affirmation, the number of steps you’ve taken, your calories or points, and any weight loss tip that you would like to share. If you screw up and eat an entire cake, let them know.

6) If you slip, start at the top of the list and do it all over again. All research shows that if you keep at it, you will develop a new lifestyle and you will lose weight.

P.S. If you follow these six steps, you’ll change the neuro-landscape of your brain. You’ll think differently, feel differently, and behave differently, and you’ll reach your weight loss goal. Make the choice. Embrace these six scientifically proven weight loss tenants. Become the weight and the person you are meant to be.

Check out Doris’ latest books, “The Boy Whose Idea Could Feed the World” as well as, “The Parent Teacher Discussion Guide.” and “Thin Becomes You”. Doris’ web page: www.doriswildhelmering.com

Read Full Post »

I want to know how can I control my temperament/anger, and increase my patience with my 3 year old son. I am out of energy, struggling with my weight/shape, time management and level of responsibility at work. I feel like a zombie.

Three year olds can be a handful and everyone seems to be overwhelmed today. Regarding your anger and weight, try this affirmation, “I choose not to be angry or overeat, I choose to be in control.”

Why this particular affirmation? Because it addresses both of your issues, anger and weight and the mere repetition of the affirmation will help you feel more calm. Say it several thousands times a day (no joking!).

Check out Doris’ latest books, “The Boy Whose Idea Could Feed the World” (a middle grade read) as well as, “The Parent Teacher Discussion Guide.” www.doriswildhelmering.com

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: